Amazon launches AWS Marketplace to help monetization

Amazon launches AWS Marketplace to help monetization

PanARMENIAN.Net - Helping to further monetize its Cloud hosting service, Amazon has launched AWS Marketplace, allowing its hosting customers to find, purchase and immediately deploy software and services they need to build, scale and develop their businesses online, The Next Web reports.

The website, which sports a similar design to Amazon’s online retail store, lists numerous Software Infrastructure stacks, servers, databases and caching and security tools. The company also provides business software including content management, CRM, eCommerce, project management and storage solutions.

It’s all designed to aid Amazon’s increasing number of AWS customers deploy solutions to boost their businesses but also provide additional features and tools for their users.

Amazon has integrated 1-Click deployment into its service, allowing users to quickly purchase and launch pre-configured software and pay by the hour or monthly. The charges are collated and added to a customer’s existing AWS bill.

Currently, customers can select software from companies including CA, Canonical, IBM, Microsoft, SAP and Zend, as well as popular open source offerings including WordPress and Drupal.

When a user finds a tool they want to use, they purchase it with one click and Amazon will automatically provide a dedicated AWS instance, allowing them to start working right away.

Instead of wading through word-of-mouth recommendations and then trying to set up the new solution, Amazon takes away the hassle and does it all for its users by providing peer reviews and charging usage fees to their existing AWS account, the report says.

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