// IP Marketing video - START// IP Marketing video - END

Microsoft unveils touch-ready version of Office

Microsoft unveils touch-ready version of Office

PanARMENIAN.Net - Microsoft has unveiled a touch-ready version of Office, the latest version of the company's market-leading productivity software suite.

In San Francisco, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer described Office 2013 as the firm's "most ambitious release" to date.

The software is primed for mobile devices, cloud computing, and social networking.

For the first time, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook are all responsive to touch-screen controls - taps, swipes, and pinch-and-zoom can be used within documents, files and presentations.

The user-experience is designed to be more "immersive," "visceral" and "multimedia-rich" compared to earlier version of Office.

The other features are:

Documents, slides, and presentations can be marked up on mobile screens, drawn on, highlighted or annotated with a digital pen, stylus or even a finger.

Skype, bought for $8.5bn (£5.4bn) in 2011, and Yammer, a social network for businesses, are being rolled into Office: live, multi-party conversations and meetings can be created with Skype video and accessed within Word, PowerPoint, or Outlook.

New "People Cards" include an individual's digital "presence" - a photo, options to email, instant message, phone or video chat, and activity feeds from the social networks Facebook and Linkedin.

Skydrive automatically saves and syncs all Office documents in an online, cloud-based storage service. This makes files and content created in Office available on demand across computing devices.

 Top stories
It was not immediately clear whether Amazon will expand this model with more physical stores or offer the technology to other retailers.
The researchers found that iPhone users are also more likely to see their phone as a status symbol than Android users.
Suppliers say they have been asked to submit prototype screens with better resolution than ones from Samsung to differentiate its models.
The scientist created a program called LipNet that achieved 93.4 percent accuracy in tests, compared to 52.3 percent human accuracy.
Partner news