Ex-officers slam Obama over leaks on bin Laden raid

Ex-officers slam Obama over leaks on bin Laden raid

PanARMENIAN.Net - A web video featuring former special forces officers accuses U.S. President Barack Obama of taking too much credit for the killing of Osama bin Laden and allowing classified information about the raid to become public, CNN reported.

The ad also includes former Navy SEALs.

The organization behind the ad, the Special Operations OPSEC Education Fund, has posted the 22-minute web video on its website. A spokeswoman says the group has raised about $1 million toward an advertising campaign in some key swing states.

Over a picture of Obama, the video's narrator says that the group's mission is to stop politicians from using sensitive intelligence about the bin Laden raid and other clandestine programs for political benefit.

In a series of interviews, former military and intelligence officers accuse Obama of seeking political gain by disclosing successful secret operations.

“As a citizen, it is my civic duty to tell the president to stop leaking information to the enemy," says Benjamin Smith, identified in the video as a former Navy SEAL. "It will get Americans killed."

Another former Navy SEAL in the video, Scott Taylor, says of the bin Laden raid: "If you disclose how we got there, how we took down the building, what we did, how many people were there, that it's going to hinder future operations, and certainly hurt the success of those future operations."

Smith also criticizes the president for taking too much credit for the SEALs' raid.

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