"Top Gun" director Tony Scott jumps to death from bridge

PanARMENIAN.Net - "Top Gun" director Tony Scott jumped to his death from the Vincent Thomas Bridge in San Pedro on Sunday, August 19 afternoon, according to The Los Angeles Times.

The 68-year-old’s body was pulled out of the water by Los Angeles Port Police, who were the first on the scene.

Several witnesses told police they saw Scott get out of his Toyota Prius, which was parked on the bridge, about 12:30 pm. Then he scaled an 8- to 10-foot fence and jumped off without any hesitation, law enforcement sources said.

A source said officials looked inside the car and determined it belonged to the famed action-movie director and producer. A note listing contact information was inside. A suicide note was later found in his office. Its contents were not revealed.

The coroner's office identified Scott on Sunday evening.

Scott was a respected director and producer who made "Man on Fire," "Enemy of the State" and "Beverly Hills Cop II."

The last film he directed was "Unstoppable,"a 2010 thriller about a runaway freight train. His career in television included executive producing the series "The Good Wife"and "Numb3rs," both on CBS.

The British director, who lived in Beverly Hills, was best known for the 1986 hit "Top Gun," starring Tom Cruise as a Navy aviator. The movie grossed $21.6 million in its first 11 days of release.

At the time of his death, Scott had recently completed filming on "Out of the Furnace," a drama he was producing about an ex-con starring Christian Bale. The movie is set to come out next year.

Scott was also preparing to produce a science-fiction drama called "Ion" and had served as executive producer on "Stoker," set to come out next March.

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