Dropbox chooses Ireland for first ever office outside U.S.

Dropbox chooses Ireland for first ever office outside U.S.

PanARMENIAN.Net - Dropbox is following up its recent milestone of 100 million registered users with an announcement that it is to open an office in Ireland, which will become its first ever presence outside of the U.S., The Next Web reports.

The storage service is setting up shop in Dublin — also home to Google, Facebook and other tech firms — although it hasn’t revealed an exact date by which the new office will open. In preparation for its Dublin base, Dropbox is actively hiring for a range of positions, including account executives, account managers, IT engineers and user ops engineers.

Dropbox recently added Italian and European Spanish to the range of languages that it covers, and the company says that the new office will help expand that linguistic support while ensuring that business users and other paying customers outside of North America will have local sales and staff available to help “at nearly all hours of the day.”

Ireland has proven popular with global technology firms thanks to the lower range of tax that the country offers — the Double Irish arrangement — and that lure has hooked another big name in the form of Dropbox. That’s despite controversy around tax that many of the companies are paying in the UK; Google and Facebook are among a series of firms that have been under pressure for paying minimal levels of corporation tax.

Dropbox was founded in 2007 and is headquartered in San Francisco. It has raised a total of $257 million in funding, which included a mega $250 million Series B round which saw investment from Sequoia Capital, Accel Partners, Greylock Partners and others.

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