Artak Sevada’s “The Genex” to be released on Genocide 100th anniv. (video)

Artak Sevada’s “The Genex” to be released on Genocide 100th anniv.

PanARMENIAN.Net - The filming of The Genex, a new movie dedicated to the centennial of the Armenian Genocide is in progress with a number of Hollywood stars involved in the production, Nouvelles d`Arménie said.

According to media reports, Armenian director Artak Sevada plans the screening of the movie on April 24, 2015 when Armenians around the world will be marking the 100th anniversary of the start of the Ottoman Empire’s genocidal policy during World War I that resulted in the killings and deportations of some 1.5 million Armenians.

According to the synopsis of the movie published on its official website, it tells about a “beautiful 25-year-old woman”, Sally Solomon, who “has spent years running from her family (and her own ethnic) history.” “But, when Sally’s father is murdered, she finds herself thrust into the middle of a vast conspiracy that puts her and the young lawyer trying to defend her against a large, powerful corporation hell bent on keeping secret its own dark involvement in the Armenian Genocide. As Sally will learn – history is a contact sport – and no one can hide from it.”

Natalie Portman, Armand Assante and Jean Mano are starring in the movie to be produced by EdgeArt Entertainment and Sevada Productions.

Several other Hollywood actors, including megastars Al Pacino and Leonardo DiCaprio, are featured in the movie’s conceptual trailer.

The Armenian Genocide

The Armenian Genocide (1915-23) was the deliberate and systematic destruction of the Armenian population of the Ottoman Empire during and just after World War I. It was characterized by massacres, and deportations involving forced marches under conditions designed to lead to the death of the deportees, with the total number of deaths reaching 1.5 million.

The majority of Armenian Diaspora communities were formed by the Genocide survivors.

Present-day Turkey denies the fact of the Armenian Genocide, justifying the atrocities as “deportation to secure Armenians”. Only a few Turkish intellectuals, including Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk and scholar Taner Akcam, speak openly about the necessity to recognize this crime against humanity.

The Armenian Genocide was recognized by Uruguay, Russia, France, Lithuania, the Italian Chamber of Deputies, majority of U.S. states, parliaments of Greece, Cyprus, Argentina, Belgium and Wales, National Council of Switzerland, Chamber of Commons of Canada, Polish Sejm, Vatican, European Parliament and the World Council of Churches.

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